Author Archives: Sean Valant

Memorial Day Sale!

Written by Sean Valant

Friday, May 23rd, 2014

In observance of Memorial Day, HostGator is offering 50% off all new hosting packages, with domains as low as $8.50 per year! The sale starts on 12am CST on Friday, May 23rd and continues through the entire weekend, ending on Monday, May 26th at 11:59pm CST.

Now is the time to grab that new domain or hosting package at a deep discount. Perhaps try your hand at a Reseller package, enjoy the added flexibility of a VPS or even step all the way up to a new Dedicated server!

This is also a great time to scoop up those additional domains, either for a new website you want to launch or maybe just to protect your brand by registering a .net or .org to go along with your existing .com domains.

Memorial Day is a time to take a moment and thank our veterans who have lost their lives in service to their country. HostGator employs many veterans and hold our military in the utmost respect. We genuinely want to thank our service men and woman for the sacrifices that they make each and every day.

MEMORIAL14 is the coupon code to take advantage of this great offer. Feel free to tell your friends, or share this coupon code out via your personal network.

No matter how you choose to celebrate the holiday, all your friends here at HostGator wish you a very safe and happy Memorial Day!

Infographic: Invasion Of Wearable Tech

Written by Sean Valant

Monday, April 28th, 2014

As technology is becoming physically smaller and relatively inexpensive, it is beginning to cross over in to fashionable (and not-so-fashionable) pieces of wearable tech.  The following infographic presents some of the cutting edge devices that fall into this new category of fashion:

invasion-of-wearable-tech-infographic

Infographic: This Will Make You Feel Old

Written by Sean Valant

Monday, April 14th, 2014

Every now and again a gentle reminder comes along to let us know that we’re just not as young as we used to be. That game system we played so much as child, or that toy that came out that we remember so vividly… oh, that was over 20 years ago, wow! Well, this infographic is one big reminder that yesterday was likely longer ago that we’d prefer it be.

this-will-make-you-feel-old-infographic

 
 

Heartbleed Bug

Written by Sean Valant

Thursday, April 10th, 2014

You may have now heard of the “Heartbleed Bug.” Before we continue, we want to reassure you that if you are hosting on a HostGator shared or reseller server, that your server has already been patched. For everyone else, HostGator customer or not, we have created the following tool to assist you with determining whether or not your site is presently vulnerable and what further action to take, if necessary: https://heartbleed.hostgator.com/

heartbleed bug

Now, what exactly is the Heartbleed Bug? Technically speaking, it is a serious vulnerability in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library. In layman’s terms, it allows the ever-present nefarious individuals the ability to intercept and decode encrypted data. The following quote comes from heartbleed.com:

“The Heartbleed bug allows anyone on the Internet to read the memory of the systems protected by the vulnerable versions of the OpenSSL software. This compromises the secret keys used to identify the service providers and to encrypt the traffic, the names and passwords of the users and the actual content. This allows attackers to eavesdrop on communications, steal data directly from the services and users and to impersonate services and users.”

The bug is so-named due to a normal function between two computers across a network (such as the Internet) sharing an encrypted connection. The “heartbeat” is simply a pulse, or packet of information, sent from one machine to the other to ensure the connection still exists. This functionality is what allows the exploit to occur, in that the heartbeat is simulated by a third party in such a way as to allow them access to the memory of the receiving server.

What this translates to is virtually unlimited, and untraceable, access to a myriad of private information which potentially can include usernames, passwords, and even credit card information. The full extent of the situation is not presently known. What is known is that we should all consider all of our passwords to be compromised. As a result, you absolutely want to update any passwords for anything and everything you log into online. However, if you change your password for an account on a server that has not been patched, then you can consider the new password compromised as well.

For full information regarding this situation, we recommend reading the associated Wikipedia article.